Shortest Day of the Year | Sunday, 22 | December | 2019

Shortest Day of the Year | Sunday, 22 | December | 2019

The winter solstice, hiemal solstice or hibernal solstice, also known as midwinter, occurs when one of the Earth's poles has its maximum tilt away from the Sun. It happens twice yearly, once in each hemisphere. Wikipedia
 
Celebrations: Festivals, spending time with loved ones, feasting, singing, dancing, fires
Date: Sunday, 22 December 2019
Significance: Astronomically marks the beginning of lengthening days and shortening nights
Also called: Midwinter, Yule, the Longest Night, Jól
Observed by: Various cultures

The Sun's Position

The Sun is directly overhead of the Tropic of Capricorn in the Southern Hemisphere during the December Solstice.

The December Solstice occurs when the Sun reaches its most southerly declination of -23.4 degrees. In other words, when the North Pole is tilted furthest away from the Sun.

Midnight Sun or Polar Night

Being the longest day of the year, also means that people in the areas south of the Antarctic Circle towards the South Pole will see the Midnight Sun, i.e. have 24 hours of daylight, during this time of the year.

For people in the Northern Hemisphere, the December solstice marks the exact opposite, the day of the year with fewest hours of daylight. North of the Arctic Circle towards the North Pole there is no direct sunlight at all during this time of the year.

Solstices in Culture

The December solstice has played an important role in cultures worldwide from ancient times until our day. Even Christmas celebrations are closely linked to the observance of the December solstice.

There are also customs linked to the June solstice along with traditions linked to the Spring (vernal) equniox and the Fall (autumnal) equinox.

December solstice in the Calendar

December 21 or 22 solstices happen more often than December 20 and 23 solstices. The last December 23 solstice was in 1903 and will not happen again until 2303. A December 20 solstice has occurred very rarely, with the next one in the year 2080.(*)

Source>https://www.timeanddate.com/calendar/december-solstice.html

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